Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance is a condition in which the body produces insulin but does not use it effectively. When people have insulin resistance, glucose builds up in the blood instead of being absorbed by the cells, leading to type 2 diabetes or prediabetes.
Most people with insulin resistance don’t know they have it for many years—until they develop type 2 diabetes, a serious, lifelong disease. The good news is that if people learn they have insulin resistance early on, they can often prevent or delay diabetes by making changes to their lifestyle.

What happens?
In insulin resistance, muscle, fat, and liver cells do not respond properly to insulin and thus cannot easily absorb glucose from the bloodstream. As a result, the body needs higher levels of insulin to help glucose enter cells.
The beta cells in the pancreas try to keep up with this increased demand for insulin by producing more. As long as the beta cells are able to produce enough insulin to overcome the insulin resistance, blood glucose levels stay in the healthy range.
Over time, insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes and prediabetes because the beta cells fail to keep up with the body’s increased need for insulin. Without enough insulin, excess glucose builds up in the bloodstream, leading to diabetes, prediabetes, and other serious health disorders.

What causes insulin resistance?
-Excess Weight
Belly fat plays a part in developing chronic, or long-lasting, inflammation in the body. Chronic inflammation can damage the body over time, without any signs or symptoms. Scientists have found that complex interactions in fat tissue draw immune cells to the area and trigger low-level chronic inflammation. This inflammation can contribute to the development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and CVD. Studies show that losing the weight can reduce insulin resistance and prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.
-Physical Inactivity
Studies show that after exercising, muscles become more sensitive to insulin, reversing insulin resistance and lowering blood glucose levels. Exercise also helps muscles absorb more glucose without the need for insulin. The more muscle a body has, the more glucose it can burn to control blood glucose levels.
-Other causes
Other causes of insulin resistance may include ethnicity; certain diseases; hormones; steroid use; some medications; older age; sleep problems, especially sleep apnea; and cigarette smoking.

Who should be tested for insulin resistance?
-The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that testing to detect prediabetes be considered in adults who are overweight or obese and have one or more additional risk factors for diabetes.
However, not everyone who is overweight will get type 2 diabetes. People without these risk factors should begin testing at age 45.
Risk factors for prediabetes—in addition to being overweight or obese or being age 45 or older—include the following:
-being physically inactive
-having a parent or sibling with diabetes
-having a family background that is African American, Alaska Native, American Indian, Asian American, Hispanic/Latino, or Pacific Islander American
-giving birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds
-being diagnosed with gestational diabetes—diabetes that develops only -during pregnancy
-having high blood pressure—140/90 mmHg or above—or being treated for high blood pressure
-HDL cholesterol level below 35 mg/dL or a triglyceride level above 250 mg/dL
-having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
-having prediabetes, impaired fasting glucose (IFG), or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) on an earlier testing
-having other conditions associated with insulin resistance, such as obesity or acanthosis nigricans
-having CVD

Can insulin resistance be reversed?
Yes.
How?
-eating a healthy diet
-reaching and maintaining a healthy weight
-increasing physical activity
-not smoking
-taking medication

http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/insulinresistance/#resistance
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insulin_resistance